Questions
Why Learn about Information Systems in Organization?

Why Learn about Information Systems in Organization?

In: Operations Management

Question 3 Process costing (25 marks) As part of your role, you provide Helen with the...

Question 3 Process costing

As part of your role, you provide Helen with the costs of running her Cutting and Machining departments in July. Only skinny jeans were manufactured in July. All work is commenced in the Cutting Department and output is then transferred to the Machining Department. No direct material is added in the Machining Department but labour and overhead costs, including thread, rivets, buttons, and zippers are incurred uniformly throughout the process. Overhead is allocated based on 125% of direct labour cost. For the Machining Department, the following work in process information for 1 March 2020 is available: 100 units, 75% complete.

Costs of this work in process include:


$

Cutting department costs transferred in

3,330

Machining department costs

Direct labour

32,000

During March 200 units were completed and transferred to Administration for dispatch. Units transferred from the Cutting Department to the Machining Department were charged to Machining at $44.50 each. Direct labour costs in March for the Machining department were $32,000.On 31 March 35 units were in process in Machining and these were estimated to be 45% complete.

Required:

For the Machining Department calculate, for the month of March, the cost of work completed and the cost of work in process as at 31 March 2020, using:

i. The weighted average cost method, and

ii. FIFO.

Use the example in Figure 7.4 of the text and the information in the Background to Divine Denim, design a job cost record for a pair of custom-made jeans.

Presentation: Use Excel to prepare your answers to parts i and ii. Cut and paste your spreadsheet results and formula view into your word document. The formula view should include the column letters and the row numbers.

In: Operations Management

For this discussion, research the Carlill vs. The Carbolic Smokeball Company. You may choose to use...

For this discussion, research the Carlill vs. The Carbolic Smokeball Company. You may choose to use the NAU Online Library or any other web search. Provide a short reference list with links of sources used at the bottom of your initial discussion post. (Do not use Wikipedia)
After you have researched this case, provide a brief summary. Include the facts about the case, court ruling, defendant's appeal, judgment, etc. Also, explain whether each element of a contract was met. Additionally, include how this could be applied in today’s business environment. Give an example or scenario in which the circumstances would be similar to the Carbolic Smokeball Case. You may provide an actual case as well.

Brief Fact Summary. The Plaintiff, believing Defendant’s advertisement that its product would prevent influenza, bought a Carbolic Smoke Ball and used it as directed from November 20, 1891 until January 17, 1892, when she caught the flu. Plaintiff brought suit to recover the 100£, which the Court found her entitled to recover. Defendant appealed.

Synopsis of Rule of Law. This case considers whether an advertising gimmick (i.e. the promise to pay 100£ to anyone contracting influenza while using the Carbolic Smoke Ball) can be considered an express contractual promise to pay.

Facts. The Defendant, the Carbolic Smoke Ball Company of London (Defendant), placed an advertisement in several newspapers on November 13, 1891, stating that its product, “The Carbolic Smoke Ball”, when used three times daily, for two weeks, would prevent colds and influenza. The makers of the smoke ball additionally offered a 100£ reward to anyone who caught influenza using their product, guaranteeing this reward by stating in their advertisement that they had deposited 1000£ in the bank as a show of their sincerity. The Plaintiff, Lilli Carlill (Plaintiff), bought a smoke ball and used it as directed. Several weeks after she began using the smoke ball, Plaintiff caught the flu.

Issue. Lindley, L.J., on behalf of the Court of Appeals, notes that the main issue at hand is whether the language in Defendant’s advertisement, regarding the 100£ reward was meant to be an express promise or, rather, a sales puff, which had no meaning whatsoever.

1. LOUISA CARLILL VS CARBOLIC SMOKE BALL COMPANY 7 DECEMBER 1892 LINDLEY LJ, BOWEN LJ, AL SMITH LJ

2. FACTS • Carbolic Smoke Ball Co. (D) manufactured and sold The Carbolic Smoke Ball. The company placed ads in various newspapers offering a reward of 100 pounds to any person who used the smoke ball three times per day as directed and contracted influenza, colds, or any other disease. To show their sincerity, ?1000 is deposited in Alliance Bank. • After seeing the ad, Carlill (P) purchased a ball and used it as directed. Carlill contracted influenza and made a claim for the reward. • Carbolic Smoke Ball refused to pay and Carlill sued for damages arising from breach of contract. Judgment for 100 pounds was entered for Carlill and Carbolic Smoke Ball appealed

3. ISSUE • WAS THERE A BINDING CONTRACT BETWEEN THE PARTIES? - A contract requires notification of acceptance - Did Mrs Carlill notify Carbolic Co of the acceptance of the offer? • THE DEFENDANT ARGUED THAT THERE WAS NO BINDING CONTRACT – the words of the ad did not amount to a promise as: - the ad was too vague to make a contract (no means of checking) - the terms are too vague (no time limit)

4. HELD • The judges unanimously decided that there was a binding contract • Carlill is successful. • Carbolic Co appealed, but was dismissed.

5. JUDGES OPINION – LINDLEY LJ • The ad was an express promise – to pay 100 pounds to anyone who contracts flu after using the ball three times daily x 2 weeks. • The ad was not a mere puff: b/c of this statement “1000 is deposited with the Alliance Bank, shewing our sincerity in the matter” – proof of sincerity to pay • Promise is binding even though not made to anyone in particular – a unilateral offer – ie. “offers to anybody who performs the conditions named in the advertisement, and anybody who does perform the condition accepts the offer”. • The ad is not so vague that it cannot be construed as a promise – the words can be reasonably construed. For example, that if you use the remedy for two weeks, you will not contract the flu within a reasonable time after that. • Notification of acceptance – notification of the acceptance need not precede the performance – “this offer is a continuing offer”

6. JUDGES OPINION – BOWEN LJ • The contract is not too vague to be enforced. Promise was not a mere puff b/c statement that 1000 pounds in bank • An offer can be made to the whole world – and will ripen into a contract with anybody who comes forward and performs the condition • Notification of acceptance - There is no need for notification of acceptance of the offer. (Bowen LJ differs from Lindley LJ on this point) • An inference should be drawn from the transaction itself that if he performs the condition, there is no need for notification. • AL SMITH LJ decides on the same basis as Lindley LJ & Bowen LJ

In: Operations Management

Explain the role of goals and goal setting in organizations

Explain the role of goals and goal setting in organizations

In: Operations Management

how would you structure an organization to ensure that its culture of accountability is actually enacted....

how would you structure an organization to ensure that its culture of accountability is actually enacted. one page paper.

In: Operations Management

Case for Analysis: Change at Defence Research and Development—DRDC Toronto DRDC Toronto is a research centre...

Case for Analysis: Change at Defence Research and Development—DRDC Toronto DRDC Toronto is a research centre whose mission is “to ensure that the Canadian Defence and National Security capabilities exploit the full potential of Human Effectiveness S&T [science and technology].” It is one of nine centres across Canada that are governed by several core values: trust and respect, commitment, client focus, creativity and innovation, teamwork, leadership, and professionalism and integrity. DRDC Toronto was founded in 1939 when the Department of National Defence (DND) recognized the importance of human factors by establishing the interdepartmental Associate Committee on Aviation Medical Research. Sir Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin, chaired the committee. DRDC Toronto has built on its early history of scientific excellence in human factors design and now serves both the Canadian forces and industrial clients with an internationally recognized combination of research facilities and expertise. DRDC Toronto has developed a range of S&T products and processes for military and industrial clients. For example, its diving tables are used around the world to reduce the risk of decompression sickness; the STING (Sustained Tolerance to INcreased G) system, provides superior G protection to jet fighter pilots; and the “Clothe the Soldier” project provided human engineering support to the Canadian Army in acquiring over 24 new items of state-of-the-art soldier protective clothing and personal equipment. These are just a few of the projects DRDC Toronto has been involved in but they are illustrative of the range and the variety of its work.1 DRDC Toronto began “a change journey” to design an organization that both integrated and acknowledged its scientific expertise while becoming more efficient and relevant to its military client. It was a particularly challenging change as there were various stakeholders within the organization who had different mental maps that shaped their behaviour. As Exhibit 10.10 shows, a mix of military, scientific, technical, and administrative staff reported ultimately to the director general, a well- published researcher in psychology. However, the military members (Canadian Forces personnel) also reported through a separate chain of command to the military commanding officer and associate director general. Dr. Pigeau was the change agent for DRDC Toronto’s “Partnership through Professionalism”—an initiative designed to promote an organizational culture of mutual respect so that all staff worked together collaboratively. He brought in external consultants as well as engaging his own personnel. He wanted to create a community of professionals dedicated to using and sharing its expertise to work on projects that would have direct and lasting benefits for its clients. The organization was to become client-driven rather than remaining a largely “silo-ed” organization where scientists did pure research of interest to them. Besides, the organization was to become better integrated and more cohesive while still recognizing the professional expertise of the various units. As part of its change, the Professional Partnership Initiative (PPI) recognized four professional streams—corporate, technical, science, and management—which cut across the hierarchy and affected both military and civilian staff. Each stream has members at different levels of experience who also have roles and responsibilities that are distinct to the stream. What is key in the design is that each stream is considered to be of equal value in serving the goals of DRDC Toronto’s clients. The streams do not replace the organization’s design (illustrated in Exhibit 10.10) nor do they challenge the military chain of command. “Rather, [the system of streams] complements it by allowing members of professional streams, civilian and military, to see how their efforts yield tangible, mission-specific effects.”2 The organizational design has two dimensions, vertical and horizontal, that establish task accountability and unity of effort, respectively. According to Dr. Pigeau, the PPI will be a successful change when it has achieved three significant outcomes: each professional stream will be able (1) to self-organize, (2) to partner well with other streams, and (3) to contribute directly to achieving the mission and vision of DRDC Toronto. See Exhibit 10.11 for observations from one member of each stream

1. What are the change challenges for DRDC Toronto?

In: Operations Management

To what degree is the ‘invisible hand’ working today as Smith envisioned; are today’s business activities...

To what degree is the ‘invisible hand’ working today as Smith envisioned; are today’s business activities producing the overall Invisible Hand benefits for society that he predicted? Is it creating general prosperity? To the degree it is not working, why? (1-2 paragraphs)

In: Operations Management

Question 2. In their work on power in organizations, John French and Bertram Raven propose five...

Question 2.

In their work on power in organizations, John French and Bertram Raven propose five ‘bases of social power’. With reference to examples, discuss these five bases and explain how they might be seen in organizations.

In: Operations Management

1: What is the name of the court of general jurisdiction in the state of Washington?...

1: What is the name of the court of general jurisdiction in the state of Washington?

2: What is the name of the trial court in the federal system?

3: When does a lawsuit begin under Washington law?

4: Explain ADR and why do businesses prefer these methods?

5: Identify the four elements of negligence.

6: What is defamation? Name 2 types of defamation.

7: What is meant by strict liablity? In what circumstances is strict liability applied?

8: What 2 basic elements must exist before a person can be prosecuted for a crime? Explain.

9: Can a corporation be prosecuted for crimes? Explain.

10: What defenses can be raised to avoid liability for criminal acts?

11: Explain the key differences between civil law and criminal law.

Please make the answers as simple as possible. Thank you so much!

In: Operations Management

The owners have concluded that they need to know more about their customers and target market....

The owners have concluded that they need to know more about their customers and target market. To obtain a better understanding of each of these issues, they logged on to the Yahoo.com and Google.com search engines. They also spent some time examining trade literature. From this review of the literature, some "Best Practices" guidelines were found on how restaurants should be run. Below is a summary of what was found:
If you do not have enough customers, first examine the quality of your food, the items on your menu, and the service.
Examine and compare your lunch and dinner customers and menu for differences.
Your waitstaff should be consistent with the image of
your restaurant. How your employees act and be have is very important. They must be well groomed, knowledgeable, polite, and speak clearly and confidently.
Menu items should represent a good value for the money.
Service should be efficient, timely, polished, and cordial.
The cleanliness and appearance of your restaurant strongly influence the success of your business.
Follow the marketing premise of "underpromise and overdeliver!"
Empower your employees to make decisions to keep your customers happy. Train your employees on what to do to resolve customer complaints instead of coming to the manager.
Create a pleasant dining atmosphere, including furniture and fixtures, decorations, lighting, music, and temperature.
Learn more about your female customers. For family outings and special occasions, women make the decision on where to dine about 75 percent of the time. With this information, the owners next need to specify the research questions and hypotheses to be examined,
2. What hypotheses should be tested?
3. Should the literature search be expanded? If yes, how?

In: Operations Management

What consumer needs are satisfied by the heniz ketup?200 words

What consumer needs are satisfied by the heniz ketup?200 words

In: Operations Management

Question 5. With reference to the work of Herbert Simon and Philip Selznick, and providing real-life...

Question 5.

With reference to the work of Herbert Simon and Philip Selznick, and providing real-life examples, discuss the principles of rational decision making and explore the reasons for non-rational decision making.

In: Operations Management

Question 6. Discuss the difference between power and authority and explore the characteristics of power in...

Question 6.

Discuss the difference between power and authority and explore the characteristics of power in organisations and how it might be enhanced.

In: Operations Management

Freight transport facilitates place utility for raw materials and manufactured goods. Analyse the given statement and...

Freight transport facilitates place utility for raw materials and manufactured goods. Analyse the given statement and provide example with explanation. (20marks)

In: Operations Management

Question 3. According to Robert Michels, “Who says organization, says oligarchy”. With reference to theory and...

Question 3.

According to Robert Michels, “Who says organization, says oligarchy”. With reference to theory and examples, explain the concept of oligarchy and how this might be seen in action in organisations.

In: Operations Management