Questions
Do you believe that a just society must ensure that its citizens enjoy certain rights and...

Do you believe that a just society must ensure that its citizens enjoy certain rights and freedoms? If you were President of a country named ImagiNation, which rights and freedoms would you guarantee your citizens?

In: Psychology

Different cultures conceptualize and measure components of intelligence in various ways. Some cultures value a person’s...

Different cultures conceptualize and measure components of intelligence in various ways. Some cultures value a person’s ability to quickly process and respond to information. Other cultures may value one’s ability to consult with members of the same culture who have more life experience in order to solve problems. Still, other cultures value creativity, formal education, and literacy as a basis of intelligence. With so many variations in cultural beliefs, how do researchers ensure accurate measurements of intelligence among different cultures? For example, can standardized tests of intellectual ability from a Western culture adequately and appropriately measure the intelligence valued by Kpelle farmers in Liberia?

For this Assignment, consider how cultures interpret intelligence differently. Reflect on how various cultures measure intelligence. Use your Final Project culture of interest and, in addition, select another culture that defines intelligence differently. Consider how you might test different cognitive abilities (e.g., memory, organization, and visualization) in each of these two different cultures.

The Assignment (4–5 pages)

American and another culture

1. Describe the two cultures you selected and compare how each culture perceives intelligence.

2. Explain three cultural factors that might influence how intelligence is perceived in each culture you selected.

3. Explain how you might measure intelligence in each culture and why you selected this method.

4. Support your responses using the Learning Resources and the current literature.

In: Psychology

Dr. Paddock is a counseling psychologist who is interested in decreasing adjustment issues in first-year college...

Dr. Paddock is a counseling psychologist who is interested in decreasing adjustment issues in first-year college students. She is curious if having students create collages of their first few weeks of school and then mailing them home will help students feel they have integrated their new life with their old and, as a result, will help them feel less homesick. She samples a group of 100 incoming college freshmen at her university and measures how homesick they are during the first week of school. During Week 4 of school, she has them make the collage and send it home. During Week 7 of school, she measures their homesickness again. She notices a significant reduction in the amount of homesickness from the pretest to the posttest and concludes that her treatment is effective.

Name two threats to internal validity that are likely to be present in Dr. Paddock’s study, given her particular design. What other explanation do these threats provide for the results found by Dr. Paddock?

In: Psychology

Describe how The Beatles' music changed during the period from 1960 to 1966. These changes can...

Describe how The Beatles' music changed during the period from 1960 to 1966. These changes can take a number of different forms, including: alterations to lyrical content and themes; changes to band/ensemble membership; changes to instrumentation used, etc.

In: Psychology

List all the eras of music and the years that they range from. List the characteristics...

List all the eras of music and the years that they range from. List the characteristics that make up each period, and two famous composers from each era.

In: Psychology

What are the movements in psychology and what are the arguments of each?

What are the movements in psychology and what are the arguments of each?

In: Psychology

Hi! Below is the case study and I want to make sure I'm on the right...

Hi! Below is the case study and I want to make sure I'm on the right track. I bolded the questions I'm interested in (1-5). Looking for people who are familiar with the DSM-5/abnormal psychology and able to answer all questions completely. Thank you! - no ICD 10 please!

Questions:

1. Diagnosis; what is the evidence for it? For this one, assume the patient has borderline disorder and answer the rest accordingly.

2. Treatment; typical treatment used for this diagnosis AND most effective treatment. IF the person is in treatment, what should we target first in terms of symptoms? How likely are they to stay in treatment and how likely are they to recover? Are meds involved and if so, what broad “type” of meds work for this disorder,?

3. Differential diagnosis (why is it this disorder and not this disorder)

4. Does the person have more than one diagnosis, what would DSM say about the criteria for diagnosing that

5. What would the primary causal theories be?

CASE STUDY BELOW (it's posted under here)

Lena is a 22 year old college student who is very upset that she has such troubles with friendships and relationships. Lena has always had issues with anxiety and she has a past history of panic attacks/panic disorder. Lena also has had a very traumatic childhood, her mother was verbally abusive and very controlling and Lena was very happy to have escaped to go to a college far away from home. She rarely visits at home as she truly hates her mother and hopes to never see her mom again. Fortunately, her parents are divorced and she can go to her dad’s house whenever she has a break at school. Lena comes to therapy not to try to resolve her issues with her mom, but rather to complain about how all of her friends always seem to abandon her and how painful this is to her. She has lots of friends, but none of them stay long or live up to her expectations. She also has lots of romantic relationships, but she says they are very chaotic as no guy has ever been able to keep up with her demands. She has very low self-esteem and only feels good about herself when she thinks other people love her. But her friends all say that she is ridiculously moody and controlling and she seems to be a rollercoaster of emotions -one minute she totally loves you and the next she totally hates you and is yelling and screaming. She is often great fun to be around, but it is very emotionally draining for her friends and partners, as she gets super upset so often.... She is also extremely jealous and possessive and this drives people crazy. She comes to therapy to figure out what is wrong with everyone else - she is not really very insightful but is willing to consider whether part of the problem might be her....

In: Psychology

Alcohol causes more problems in society than any other psychoactive drug explain the reasons for this...

Alcohol causes more problems in society than any other psychoactive drug

explain the reasons for this statement in terms of

- damage to the individual , both physically and mentally

- the specific damaging effects of binge drinking on affected persons and to society as a whole , including possible violence/injury , health cost, withdrawal treatments / programs

In: Psychology

Can prostitution be a victimless crime since it involves consensual sexual activity between two parties, the...

Can prostitution be a victimless crime since it involves consensual sexual activity between two parties, the prostitute and the client or is prostitution, by its very nature, degrading and demeaning to the person who sells her or his body to others? Since it is the prostitute who is usually the one arrested and punished, are legal penalties merely another way of victimizing the victim? Should prostitution be legalized, decriminalized, or remain criminalized? Evaluate the pros and cons of each option.

In: Psychology

The place of the woman-what was the place of the woman in prehistory, was Neolithic? Guide...

The place of the woman-what was the place of the woman in prehistory, was Neolithic?

Guide questions: Is there anything in the woman who by nature makes her stand in that role? How do you think this origin has affected the woman today? Do you consider that it is just the position that women occupy in our societies? Explains. Include examples that can support your research and give credit to your references in APA format.

In: Psychology

Lucy Barnes, a 30-year-old woman who is 25 weeks pregnant, comes to the emergency department of...

Lucy Barnes, a 30-year-old woman who is 25 weeks pregnant, comes to the emergency department of Parkfield Community Hospital. She says she fell and hit her head at home and is having headaches. During the assessment, the nurse notices multiple bruises in various stages of healing over her body and asks Lucy how she got them. Lucy says that she is just clumsy and falls a lot. While the nurse is assessing Lucy, another nurse enters the room to tell Lucy that her boyfriend is there to take her back home. At that point, Lucy becomes frightened and tells the nurse that her boyfriend has hit her many times before and had knocked her down today. She says he has threatened to kill her if she tells anyone and she does not want to leave with him. Question 1 Identify questions that the nurse could use in continuing her assessment and in documenting the discussion with Lucy. Question 2 What other people should be involved in Lucy’s care in the emergency department? Question 3 Who should make the decision about where Lucy should go?

In: Psychology

350 WORDS ON WHY PEOPLE FIND IT HARD TO MATURE (parental sheltering, bad experience with friends...

350 WORDS ON WHY PEOPLE FIND IT HARD TO MATURE (parental sheltering, bad experience with friends early on, environmental experiences) -

In: Psychology

For this assignment, imagine you have been contacted by an agency in your community to provide...

For this assignment, imagine you have been contacted by an agency in your community to provide consultation on how they might improve their services to clients. The agency is concerned that clients with serious counseling issues are "falling between the cracks" when they are referred to others in the community for intensive treatment. Furthermore, the brief aftercare they provide is not accessible enough to sufficiently support clients as they re-integrate into the community.

1) Identify elderly individuals who are socially isolated and depressed.

2) Evaluate how elderly individuals who are socially isolated and depressed have been served in the history of clinical mental health counseling.

In: Psychology

Is Depression Really On The Rise? If So, Why? November 2016 - If you look at...

Is Depression Really On The Rise? If So, Why? November 2016 - If you look at depression statistics spread over several years, a very worrying trend becomes immediately apparent. Cases of depression begin to rise extremely sharply in around 2005, and continue to escalate at an alarming pace. Should the problem continue in this vein, it seems that everyone in the world will before long be suffering from depression, or some form of anxiety disorder. Not good. Science and psychiatry are, it seems, a little divided on the issue. Various theories as to the source of the problem have been put forward, but there is as yet no real consensus. Some do not even believe that the problem is real, attributing the statistical rise to diagnostic improvements and a change in culture. So what, if anything, is going on? What do people think is behind this problem? The Internet One of the most common theories holds that the rise in internet usage has - directly or indirectly - brought a host of mental health problems in its wake. The theorized abilities of the internet to change our brains and trigger neurosis are multiform, and a whole book could be written on the phenomenon. Briefly, however, here are some of the more common points made: The internet causes addiction. Many scientists, particularly in Asia (where it's a big problem) believe that the dopamine surge caused by receiving information, validation, and 'rewards' through gameplay via the internet can cause pathological usage and addiction. This naturally alters the brain's chemistry, predisposing many heavy internet users to anxieties and depressive states. It's an as-yet little understood phenomenon, but people are taking it seriously - so much so that many health insurers are adding internet addiction to the list of things they cover. The internet reduces our 'mental downtime'. Instead of relaxing when we get home, we log immediately into the internet, over-stimulating our brains with both work and leisure, and effectively preventing them from getting the vital rest they need to start processing the emotions and experiences of the day. This ultimately leads to mental health problems like depression. The internet feeds us a lot of depressing news, and makes us periodically angry (more on that later). The internet (and social media in particular) puts us under subliminal pressure to achieve a standardized 'perfection' - showing us the carefully tailored social media streams of our friends, which appear to show a 'perfect' life to which we cannot possibly live up. This is all of course heavily edited and a 'glossy' version of the actual (more mundane) truth, but it nonetheless causes a good deal of insecurity and feelings of worthlessness. Urbanization The world has reached an unprecedented landmark. By 2017, it's thought that the majority of people will be living in urban areas. In the past, the majority of people worldwide have always lived in small rural communities - with urban centres making up a significant population proportion, but never greater than the whole sum of humanity. Now, however, the cities are expanding and more people are moving to them. This, it is thought, increases depression risk in a number of ways: Lack of access to 'green spaces'. It's by now well known that our mental health is significantly boosted by time spent outdoors, preferably in green, leafy spaces. The urban environment and lifestyle makes doing this much harder - and even those who regularly enjoy parks may lack the kind of distraction-free experience gained by those in the countryside, due to the presence of lots of other people. Anonymity. In small, rural communities, people are known to one another, and are often cared for by the community should things go wrong. While many urban communities are very cohesive, it is nonetheless more common to experience 'anonymity' in cities. When nobody really knows who you are, and you lack a sense of 'place', 'tribe', or general human connection, it is easy to succumb to feelings of worthlessness and depression. Stress. Everyday urban life tends to be more 'high powered' and stressful than rural life. Negotiating traffic, constant noise, enhanced crime rates, busy jobs... all of these enhance an urban-dweller's risk of stress, which in turn raises their risk of developing depression. Lifestyle It's no secret that we're becoming increasingly sedentary, and eating an increasingly poor diet. Without good cardiovascular health (as is bestowed by regular exercise), our brains are less able to receive nourishment from the blood. And without the right kind of diet, that nourishment which they do receive is sub-par and unable to fulfil all of the brain's requirements to keep our mental and emotional health at a reasonable equilibrium. It's thought that dietary and general lifestyle improvements could make an enormous difference to the global mental health situation. Fear There has been much talk recently about the 'politics of fear'. Media and political campaigns designed to elicit sales and votes by scaremongering have become much more common in recent years, and the stress, hatred, and anger provoked by these can have an extremely negative effect on mental health. What is more, the internet provides us with access to negative news stories in unprecedented amounts. All of this serves to make us more anxious, and renders our ruminations rather more negative than would otherwise be the case. Statistics Some, however, believe that all of the above is simply an illusion, and that the real problem is not a problem at all. In recent years, we have become far better at accepting, seeking help for, and diagnosing mental health problems - all over the world. Perhaps we've always been this depressed - it's just that we're more self-aware about it now... I need to summarize the above article in one page

In: Psychology

For this assignment, imagine you have been contacted by an agency in your community to provide...

For this assignment, imagine you have been contacted by an agency in your community to provide consultation on how they might improve their services to clients. The agency is concerned that clients with serious counseling issues are "falling between the cracks" when they are referred to others in the community for intensive treatment. Furthermore, the brief aftercare they provide is not accessible enough to sufficiently support clients as they re-integrate into the community.

1) Identify a population with mental health counseling needs as well as other needs, for example:

- People experiencing chronic or severe mental illnesses who also experience homelessness.

- Children with medical needs who also experience high anxiety.

- Elderly individuals who are socially isolated and depressed.

- Chemically dependent persons with recurring mental health crises.

2)Evaluate how the group you identified has been served in the history of clinical mental health counseling.

In: Psychology