Questions
Why did the 1969 occupation of Alcatraz occur? What was the significance of Alcatraz to the...

Why did the 1969 occupation of Alcatraz occur? What was the significance of Alcatraz to the American Indian? What kind pf contribution do you believe this occupation made? References incude

In: Psychology

Psychological egoism is the theory that all human actions are aimed at avoiding some personal loss...

Psychological egoism is the theory that all human actions are aimed at avoiding some personal loss or gaining some personal benefit. If the theory is true, then altruism—the direct desire to benefit others for their own sake—does not exist. Psychological egoism is a descriptive theory about how people do behave rather than an ethical theory about how they ought to behave. Still, the truth of psychological egoism would have important ethical implications. Because we can’t be morally obligated to do the impossible, the truth of psychological egoism would mean that we cannot be obligated to behave altruistically. Accepting this would require us to substantially revise our ideas about morality.

There are a number of arguments for psychological egoism. One argument begins with the claim that every action is based on the strongest desire of the person performing it. For this to support the theory, however, the egoist must make the case that all of our strongest desires are for personal gain. A second argument claims that people always expect their actions to make them better off.

Ethical egoism is the theory that actions are morally right just because they best promote one’s self-interest. Although psychological egoism is one source of support for ethical egoism, one can consistently accept ethical egoism—the view that we ought to behave self-interestedly—while rejecting psychological egoism—the view that we always do behave in this way. Ethical egoism faces a serious difficulty at the outset: the theory implies that it is morally right to kill, rape, and steal any time these actions would be in our self-interest. These actions seem to be paradigmatic cases of immorality. This doesn’t prove that ethical egoism is false because our conventional ideas about morality could be mistaken. It does suggest, however, that we should accept ethical egoism only if there are strong arguments in its favor.

Egoists have advanced several arguments to support their position. Some claim that everyone would be better off if we were all to behave egoistically. According to egoism, however, the fact that something makes everyone better off is morally irrelevant, so this argument cannot support ethical egoism. Many egoists invoke libertarianism, according to which all of our moral duties derive from the sources of consent and reparation, to support egoism. The egoist cannot consistently accept such a view, however, because ethical egoism is committed to the idea that consent and reparation do not generate obligations—only self-interest can do so. The best argument for ethical egoism claims that if we’re morally required to do something, then we have good reason to do it. Furthermore, we have good reason to do something only if it makes us better off. This latter claim is questionable, however, because there seem to be cases in which we have good reason to do something (say, help a stranger) even if doing so does not benefit us.

Egoism also faces three serious problems. As mentioned before, it violates many widely shared moral beliefs. In addition, it cannot allow for the existence of moral rights that protect us from interference from others. After all, if violating my supposed rights would benefit you, egoism says that you morally ought to do so. Finally, egoism seems to arbitrarily elevate the interests of a single person over everyone else, and it is not clear how to defend such a bias. Given that the main arguments for egoism fail and that the theory suffers serious problems, we seem to be justified in rejecting it.

After reading the above text answer the following.

"What is the relationship between psychological egoism and ethical egoism? Define each theory and explain how they are similar and how they differ. Does accepting one theory commit you to accepting the other? Does rejecting one commit you to rejecting the other? Why or why not?" Write at-least 200 words.

In: Psychology

Identify and explain two weaknesses of the Transtheoretical Model.

Identify and explain two weaknesses of the Transtheoretical Model.

In: Psychology

show how social constructionist theories (like Mead and CMM) actually work with Interactionist Theory to allow...

show how social constructionist theories (like Mead and CMM) actually work with Interactionist Theory to allow us the potential to create a better social world. Review basic ideas of social construction and then show how it connects to Watzlawick's theory.

In: Psychology

Identify the rates of prevalence of puberty rituals across cultures, and explain the function of these rituals...

Identify the rates of prevalence of puberty rituals across cultures, and explain the function of these rituals
THIS IS ACTUALLY PSYCHOLOGY

In: Psychology

Compare and contrast the challenges facing adolescents in the six major regions of the world THIS IS...

Compare and contrast the challenges facing adolescents in the six major regions of the world

THIS IS ACTUALLY PSYCHOLOGY

In: Psychology

A rationale for why each movement is/was considered essential to understanding human behavior and experiences. (Psychoanalysis,...

A rationale for why each movement is/was considered essential to understanding human behavior and experiences. (Psychoanalysis, Behaviorism, and Humanistic/Transpersonal/Existential (HTE) Psychology)

In: Psychology

Question: What is gender identity? Gender identity is defined as a personal conception of oneself as...

Question: What is gender identity?

Gender identity is defined as a personal conception of oneself as male or female (or rarely, both or neither). This concept is intimately related to the concept of gender role, which is defined as the outward manifestations of personality that reflect the gender identity. Gender identity, in nearly all instances, is self-identified, as a result of a combination of inherent and extrinsic or environmental factors; gender role, on the other hand, is manifested within society by observable factors such as behaviour and appearance. For example, if a person considers himself a male and is most comfortable referring to his personal gender in masculine terms, then his gender identity is male. However, his gender role is male only if he demonstrates typically male characteristics in behavior, dress, and/or mannerisms.

In: Psychology

Direction:  Information must be 200 word count Chapter 3 Speaking and Listening Identify the key instructional and...

Direction:  Information must be 200 word count

Chapter 3 Speaking and Listening

Identify the key instructional and management moves that support student success.

1. What role does evidence-base reading and writing play in supporting students with academic conversations?

2. How do these practices affect student understanding and comprehension?

3. What role does assessment play in supporting students to achieve proficiency with speaking and listening standards?

In: Psychology

Should we abolish beauty norms? How could we feasibly achieve this?

Should we abolish beauty norms? How could we feasibly achieve this?

In: Psychology

1)Hyper-Personal effect is good in social media? why? 2)Hyper-Personal effect is bad in social media? why?

1)Hyper-Personal effect is good in social media? why?

2)Hyper-Personal effect is bad in social media? why?

In: Psychology

Discuss the history and development of the theories of Psychoanalysis, Behaviorism, and   Humanistic/Transpersonal/Existential (HTE) Psychology)

Discuss the history and development of the theories of Psychoanalysis, Behaviorism, and   Humanistic/Transpersonal/Existential (HTE) Psychology)

In: Psychology

A therapist works in a non-profit counseling center that specializes in working with women and families....

A therapist works in a non-profit counseling center that specializes in working with women and families. The therapist meets with a child and her mother in a therapy session. The parents are divorced and the child lives with the mother. The father has standard visitation rights. During the session, the mother tells the therapist that she believes the non-custodial father may be sexually abusing the child. The therapist has seen the child and the mother over a period of months and this has never been mentioned before. The therapist instructs the Mother to call CPS to report the suspected abuse. It is late on Friday afternoon. The counseling center has as one of its goals to empower women to be proactive in protecting themselves and their children. The therapist is under supervision. She calls her supervisor before leaving and goes over her session and her plan to check to make sure on Monday that the mother has called CPS. The therapist agrees to this plan. On Monday morning, the therapist calls the Mother to make sure she has made a report. The Mother says she did not make a report and that she expected the therapist to report. The therapist calls CPS to report what she was told. Later the mother files a complaint against the therapist with the Board for not reporting the abuse at the time she was told about the suspected abuse. Analyze the case fully including the validity of the complaint, the therapist actions, and what you would have done in the same situation and why. Explain your answer fully.

In: Psychology

In determining the causes of others' behavior, we overemphasize _____ factors; this is the _____. Select...

In determining the causes of others' behavior, we overemphasize _____ factors; this is the _____.
Select one:
a. situational; fundamental attribution error
b. dispositional; self-serving bias
c. situational; self-serving bias
d. dispositional; fundamental attribution error

In: Psychology

Give an analysis of behaviorism and include the theoretical underpinnings of the movement and the primary...

Give an analysis of behaviorism and include the theoretical underpinnings of the movement and the primary tenets and concepts of the movement?

In: Psychology