Question

In: Chemistry

You are given some ferrous iodide, , and are asked to extract the iron through electrolysis. What can be said about the merits of molten versus aqueous FeI2

You are given some ferrous iodide and are asked to extract the iron through electrolysis. What can be said about the merits of molten versus aqueous FeI2?

  • You'll have to perform electrolysis of the aqueous solution because you can't get iron metal from electrolysis of the molten salt.
  • You'll have to perform electrolysis on the molten salt because you can't get iron metal from electrolysis of the aqueous solution.
  • Electrolysis of either the molten or aqueous salt will produce solid iron.
  • Electrolysis will not produce solid iron regardless of whether the salt is molten or aqueous

Solutions

Expert Solution

Iron (II) iodide has a relatively low melting point. Electrolysis of the molten salt will probably produce solid metallic iron and liquid I2 as well as iodine vapor. The temperature need not be high enough to cause Fe to melt.

so Electrolysis of either the molten or aqueous salt will produce solid iron.

 

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